Red Deer Carpet Cleaning


Carpet, Upholstery and Area Rug Cleaning FAQs Here are answers to some of our customer’s most frequently asked questions. If you can’t find the answer you’re looking for please feel free to contact us. What method of carpet cleaning does AspenClean use? We use a green cleaning method of course! Hot water extraction cleaning combined with our natural cleaning products will leave your floors or furniture in immaculate condition. How does hot water extraction carpet cleaning work? First we pre-treat carpets, high traffic areas and spots using our natural cleaning products . Then, we run our state-of-the art, high-powered hot water extraction cleaning system over the entire area. Hot water is injected into the carpet to further loosen up dirt and remove any cleaning solution. Finally a powerful vacuum sucks out all the debris leaving your carpets sanitary, clean and free of residue or odor. How long will it take for my carpets to dry? Typically between five and eight hours. Drying time depends on a number of factors such as the type and density of your carpet, room temperature, humidity and air movement. To speed up the drying time, keep your windows open for a few hours after the carpet cleaning is completed. Do you use portable or truck mounted equipment? 

Our technicians are equipped with both portable and truck mounted hot water extraction systems. The appropriate system will be used based on the access avaliable for your home. What is the difference between wet and dry carpet cleaning? Wet carpet cleaning (also known as hot water extraction) is neither harmful nor toxic and is safe for children and pets. This system injects hot water into your carpet at high pressure and a powerful vacuum sucks up the water together with any dirt, cleaning products or other debris leaving no residue behind. Dry carpet cleaning methods come in many forms. Some methods utilize powders, crystals, solvents and even shampoos. Often harmful residues can be left behind resulting from a lack of rinsing and perform more of a surface clean compared to hot water extraction carpet cleaning. How often should I have my carpet or upholstery cleaned? Every six months to one year. Frequency will depend on the amount of traffic you have in your home. Don’t wait for your carpets to smell funny or look bad before having them cleaned - this may negatively affect your health and the investment in your carpet. How can I help keep my carpets and upholstery clean between professional cleaning? AspenClean recommends that you vacuum your carpets regularly with a HEPA equipped vacuum cleaner. 

A common process of hot water extraction [1] begins with preconditioning. Alkaline agents such as ammonia solution for synthetic carpets, or acidic solution (such as vinegar solution) for woolen carpets, are sprayed into the carpet, then agitated with a grooming brush or an automatic scrubbing machine. Next, a pressurized manual or automatic cleaning tool (such as a wand) passes over the surface to rinse out all pre-conditioner, residue, and particulates. If an alkaline detergent is used on a woolen fibre, use of an acetic acid solution will restore neutral fiber pH. The acid rinse thus neutralizes the alkaline residues, and can contribute to softening cleaned fabrics.[2] The hot water extraction method is the preferred method of many carpet manufacturers.[citation needed] Extraction is, by far, the most important step in the hot water extraction process. Since the hot-water extraction method uses much more water than other methods like bonnet or shampoo cleaning, proper extraction and air flow are critical to avoid drying issues. Drying time may also be decreased by extra use of fans, air conditioning, and/or outdoor ventilation.[3] Older surfaces, such as double jute-backed carpets and loose rugs with natural foundation yarns, could shrink after a wet treatment, leading to suppositions that wet-cleaning could also remove wrinkles.[citation needed] However, this notion is antiquated and this method could also occasionally tear seams or uproot strips.[citation needed] Newer carpets, such as with synthetic backing and foundation yarns, do not shrink, and they smooth easily; in such carpets, wrinkles indicate an underlying problem, such as adhesive, that may need a certified carpet inspector to determine.[4] Wet-cleaning systems naturally require drying time, which may lead to concerns about very slow drying, the risk of discoloration returning during drying, and odors, bacteria, fungi, molds, and mildews. 

Carpet cleaning specialists try to find a balance between rapid drying (attributable to lower flow rate through the cleaning jets of a spray system) and the need to remove the most soil (attributable to higher flow rate).[3] Pretreatments similar to those in dry-cleaning and "very low moisture" systems are employed, but require a longer dwell time of 15 to 20 minutes, because of lower amounts of carpet agitation. Ideal pretreatments should rinse easily and leave dry, powdery, or crystalline residue that can be flushed without contributing to re-soiling.[2] Dry-cleaning[edit] For more details on this topic, see Dry carpet cleaning. Many dry carpet-cleaning systems rely on specialized machines. These systems are mostly "very low moisture" (VLM) systems, relying on dry compounds complemented by application cleaning solutions, and are growing significantly in market share due in part to their very rapid drying time,[3] a significant factor for 24-hour commercial installations. Dry-cleaning and "very low moisture" systems are also often faster and less labor-intensive than wet-extraction systems. Heavily soiled areas require the application of manual spotting, pretreatments, preconditioners, and/or "traffic-lane cleaners", (commonly sprayed onto carpet prior to the primary use of the dry-cleaning system) which are detergents or emulsifiers which break the binding of different so Dry compound[edit] This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) A 98% biodegradable or others,[5] slightly moist absorbent cleaning compound may be spread evenly over carpet and brushed or scrubbed in. For small areas, a household hand brush can work such a compound into carpet pile; working like "tiny sponges", the attracted cleaning solution dissolve dirt, dirt and grime is attracted/absorbed to the compound, after a short drying time (the cleaning solution which is attracted to the compound must evaporate), it will be removed with a vacuum cleaner, the drier the better, leaving carpet immediately clean and dry. But it's very difficult to remove all residues, the residues can cause allergies and biological compounds may cause discolourations on carpets.

 Encapsulation also avoids the drying time of carpet shampoos, making the carpet immediately available for use. The use of encapsulation to create a crystalline residue that can be immediately (20-30 min. drytime) vacuumed (as opposed to the residue of wet cleaning systems, which generally requires an additional day before vacuuming) is a newer technology that has recently become an accepted method for commercial and residential deep cleaning.[4] Bonnet[edit] This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) After club soda mixed with cleaning product, other products are also possible, is deposited onto the surface as mist, a round buffer or "bonnet" scrubs the mixture with rotating motion. This industry machine resembles a floor buffer, with an absorbent spin or oscillating pad that attracts soil and is rinsed or replaced repeatedly. The bonnet method is not strictly dry-cleaning and involves significant drying time. To reduce pile distortion, the absorbent bonnet should be kept well-lubricated with cleaning solution. Its not recommended to dunk the bonnet in a bucket of cleaning solution and then wring it out with a mop-bucket wringer, then the bonnet is to wet. Its very important to change or turn the bonnet early, Bonnets can become filled with soil in just a couple hundred square feet.

(March 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Dry foam cleaning[8] involves applying cleaning foam and immediately vacuuming the foam. It is not a completely dry method since the foam is 90% air and 10% liquid. A dry foam machine consists of a pressure tank in which a solution of water and shampoo is added. This method is used for water sensitive carpets, needle felt, and other carpet types whose construction inhibits sufficient water extraction. Vacuum wash[edit] This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Vacuum washing[9] employs a washhead that sprays water without detergent and immediately removes it by suction, creating a swirl of water. This ensures high cleaning performance, extracting the dirt from the carpet to a depth of half inch. By immediately reabsorbing the wash water, the drying time greatly shortened. This method is suitable for intermediate and basic cleaning. Because it does not require cleaning products, it leaves no detergent residue. Vacuum washing has long been in use in Europe, mostly in larger train and bus companies, schools, and historic preservation. The system works on all surfaces which are water resistant (carpet, upholstered furniture, wooden floors, stone, plastics). A great advantage is that this system works without brushes or pads so there is no abrasion on pile. Household processes[edit] Other household carpet-cleaning processes are much older than industry standardization, and have varying degrees of effectiveness as supplements to the more thorough cleaning methods accepted in the industry. Vacuum[edit] For more details on this topic, see Vacuum cleaner. Vacuum cleaners use air pumps to create partial vacuums to suck up dust and dirt, usually from floors and carpets. Filtering systems or cyclones collect dirt for later disposal. Modern carpet cleaning equipment use rotary vacuum heads and spray jets to deep clean the carpet through hundreds of multi-directional cleaning passes. Some add steam and agitation.