Red Deer Steam Carpet Cleaning

Red Deer Carpet Cleaning
 

Q: Once you have your carpets cleaned, do they get dirty faster? A: I’ve heard that saying a lot of times myself. It’s been around a long time, and years ago it was true. It comes from a time when most carpets were shampooed. The carpets were scrubbed with a foaming cleaner and then the foam was either sucked out with a wet vacuum or in some cases, allowed to dry and then dry vacuumed in an attempt to remove the residues. The problem was that the shampoo or other cleaning products were never actually rinsed from the carpet. The remaining residues made the carpet slightly sticky and from then on the carpet would attract dirt faster. Many years ago, we were the first in the area to offer hot water extraction or “steam cleaning” and this greatly reduced the amount of residues left in the carpet. However, it did not completely solve the problem because there was still no separate rinse performed. Unfortunately today, many cleaning firms still use the steam cleaning machines or truck mounts in the same old way. Q: I vacuum regularly and we’re careful with spills. Why do I need the carpets cleaned? A: Great! Regular vacuuming is one of the best things you can do for your carpet. Don’t forget to use the hose end or a small tool to vacuum the outer edge of any carpeted stairs you may have. The soil really gets impacted in this area from traffic and most people just vacuum the top of the tread area. Eventually however, vacuuming will not be enough to maintain the carpet. The problem is that over time, an oily film builds on the carpet. This can come from pollution, moisture and cooking oils in the air, perspiration from bare feet, etc. Another big source of oily film is pets; they have oily coats and they sweat from their feet (I know, I have three large dogs!). Now it’s not that this oily film in itself looks dirty, but what happens is that all the dust and dirt we all have sticks to the oil and therefore to the carpet. At this point, your vacuum can no longer remove it and you must have it cleaned to remove the oil and dirt. The good news is that the cleaning method and products that we use are the very best at removing the oily film and soil. Q: How often should I have my carpets cleaned? 

 Q. Why shouldn’t I just rent a carpet cleaning unit and save some money? It is true you can definitely save money doing it your self, but at what is the true cost? Improperly treating stains with the incorrect product, or pH can permanently set a spot, a spot that could easily been removed by us. Portables, especially the rental ones lack suction, the ability to remove all the debris and equally important the water you have injected. This inability to fully remove all that water can leave your carpets wet for days not a few hours like us, causing bacterial growth and the odours that go along with them. Time is money, figuring the time to pick up, set up, move furniture, and return you could easily spend an entire day soaking your carpets, in the same time period we could have cleaned and fully dried your carpets. The place that rents the units to you will NOT give you a money back guarantee if you are not satisfied with your cleaning or help you remove the browning or wicking back of spots after it dries in a few days. We back ours with a money back warranty and a 30 day no spot returns guarantee or else we will. Q. Does your cleaning process soak the backing of the carpet? No, although our process rinses the carpet deep down, moisture does not penetrate the backing of the carpet. With our powerful truck mounted equipment, your carpet is thoroughly rinsed, and left only damp to the touch. The best way to prove this is to clean front door mats which are the most soiled carpets in a home. Upon cleaning, we welcome you to flip it over and you will find that the floor is 100% dry and no water has gone thru to the carpet backing. Many proponents of dry cleaning will tell you that steam cleaning soaks the carpet, pad, and sub floors – this simply does not happen with our powerful cleaning machines. Put us to the test – we have nothing to hide. Q. Can you get the pet odour out of my carpet? Pet odour is a very common problem. At AAA Steam Carpet Cleaning we can help you deal with your pet odours. The problem with pet odour is that it can be much deeper than it first appears. Pet urine can easily soak through the backing of the carpet into the padding underneath. In more severe cases the urine can penetrate into the sub-floor beneath the padding. This creates a problem that is multi-layered. The urine also provides for the growth of bacteria. This in turn contributes to a worsening of the odour problem and can contribute to permanent color loss of the carpet fiber. Left untreated over a period of time pet odour can become absorbed into many of the porous materials in your home. Draperies, sheet rock, upholstered furniture, baseboards, even the concrete foundation are just a few of the materials that can absorb these odours. We offer a range of solutions to help you solve your pet odour problems. To answer your question – a complete inspection of your carpet, pad and subfloor would have to be done. When the subfloor and pad are saturated carpet cleaning alone will not remove the odours completely, as the odours will wick up from the subfloor and pad. We can guarantee complete pet odour removal with out the removal and replacement of effected pad, sealing of the subfloor and cleaning of both sides of the carpet. So it is best to get us in as soon as possible to treat these accidents before the damage sinks in. Q. Do I have to be home while my carpet is being cleaned? It is not necessary that you be home while your carpet is cleaned because our carpet cleaners are professionals, fully trained, reliable and insured. However, we recommend that someone be home before we begin cleaning to discuss carpet care issues pertaining to your carpet, and to discuss which cleaning package you would prefer. Q. Why do some stains reappear after carpets have dried? Some spots may reappear after drying or after a few days of usage. This is usually caused by a previous soap build-up or stickiness from a spill. Spots reappearing from a process called

Vacuum washing has long been in use in Europe, mostly in larger train and bus companies, schools, and historic preservation. The system works on all surfaces which are water resistant (carpet, upholstered furniture, wooden floors, stone, plastics). A great advantage is that this system works without brushes or pads so there is no abrasion on pile. Household processes[edit] Other household carpet-cleaning processes are much older than industry standardization, and have varying degrees of effectiveness as supplements to the more thorough cleaning methods accepted in the industry. Vacuum[edit] For more details on this topic, see Vacuum cleaner. Vacuum cleaners use air pumps to create partial vacuums to suck up dust and dirt, usually from floors and carpets. Filtering systems or cyclones collect dirt for later disposal. Modern carpet cleaning equipment use rotary vacuum heads and spray jets to deep clean the carpet through hundreds of multi-directional cleaning passes. Some add steam and agitation. Models include upright (dirty-air and clean-air), canister and backpack, wet-dry and pneumatic, and other varieties. Robotic vacuum cleaners have recently become available. Stain removal[edit] Cleaned and uncleaned areas of a carpet Tea leaves and cut grass were formerly common for floor cleaning, to collect dust from carpets, albeit with risks of stains. Ink was removed with lemon or with oxalic acid and hartshorn; oil with white bread or with pipe clay; grease fats with turpentine; ox gall and naphtha were also general cleaners. Ammonia and chloroform were recommended for acid discoloration. Benzine and alum were suggested for removing insects;[10] diatomaceous earth and material similar to cat litter are still common for removing infestations. Candle wax is removed by placing a towel over the affected carpet area and applying steam from a clothes iron until the wax absorbs into the towel. Some traditional methods of stain removal remain successful and ecological. Caution should be addressed when treating natural fibers such as wool. The longer the stain material remains in the carpet, the higher the chance of permanent color change, even if all the original stain material is removed. At times pets urinate on the carpet and this results in a bad odor especially when it is hot and humid.The carpet or rug is usually taken outside and immersed in water to remove such stains. Immediately blotting (not rubbing) the stain material as soon as possible will help reduce the chances of permanent color change. Artificial food coloring stains are generally considered permanent stains. These may be removed by professional cleaners or deep cleaning rental machines with heat-transfer stain-reducing chemicals, but carry risks of burning the carpet. Stain removal products can be combined with anti-allergen treatments to kill house dust mites. Other[edit] Carpet rods, rattan rugbeaters, and carpet-beating machines for beating out dust, and also brooms, brushes, dustpans, and shaking and hanging were all carpet-cleaning methods of the 19th century; brooms particularly carry risks of wear. Steam cleaning increases the lifespan of your carpet.[10] Misconceptions[edit] Robert Wittkamp (1942–2007), IICRC-certified master Carpet Cleaners technician with 30 years' expertise in carpet cleaning, commented that old wives' tales persist and thrive within the industry. For instance, the concept that walking barefoot on a carpet may lead to damage from body oils has not been supported or disproven by standardized reports or testing or by industry evidence.[4]