Red Deer Steam Carpet Cleaning

Red Deer Carpet Cleaning
 

Carpet, Upholstery and Area Rug Cleaning FAQs How does hot water extraction carpet cleaning work? First we pre-treat carpets, high traffic areas and spots using our natural cleaning products . Then, we run our state-of-the art, high-powered hot water extraction cleaning system over the entire area. Hot water is injected into the carpet to further loosen up dirt and remove any cleaning solution. Finally a powerful vacuum sucks out all the debris leaving your carpets sanitary, clean and free of residue or odor. How long will it take for my carpets to dry? Typically between five and eight hours. Drying time depends on a number of factors such as the type and density of your carpet, room temperature, humidity and air movement. To speed up the drying time, keep your windows open for a few hours after the carpet cleaning is completed. Do you use portable or truck mounted equipment? Our technicians are equipped with both portable and truck mounted hot water extraction systems. The appropriate system will be used based on the access avaliable for your home. What is the difference between wet and dry carpet cleaning? Wet carpet cleaning (also known as hot water extraction) is neither harmful nor toxic and is safe for children and pets. This system injects hot water into your carpet at high pressure and a powerful vacuum sucks up the water together with any dirt, cleaning products or other debris leaving no residue behind. Dry carpet cleaning methods come in many forms. Some methods utilize powders, crystals, solvents and even shampoos. Often harmful residues can be left behind resulting from a lack of rinsing and perform more of a surface clean compared to hot water extraction carpet cleaning. How often should I have my carpet or upholstery cleaned? Every six months to one year. Frequency will depend on the amount of traffic you have in your home. Don’t wait for your carpets to smell funny or look bad before having them cleaned - this may negatively affect your health and the investment in your carpet. How can I help keep my carpets and upholstery clean between professional cleaning? AspenClean recommends that you vacuum your carpets regularly with a HEPA equipped vacuum cleaner. Clean entrance ways and high traffic areas more often and always clean up spills immediately. Carpet cleaning, for appearance, and the removal of stains, dirt, and allergens is done through several methods. Clean carpets are recognized by manufacturers as being more visually pleasing, potentially longer-lasting, and probably healthier than poorly maintained carpets.[1] Contents [hide] 1 Hot Water Extraction 2 Dry-cleaning 2.1 Dry compound 2.2 Encapsulation 2.3 Bonnet 2.4 Shampoo 2.5 Dry foam carpet cleaning 2.6 Vacuum wash 3 Household processes 3.1 Vacuum 3.2 Stain removal 3.3 Other 3.4 Misconceptions 4 References Hot Water Extraction[edit] For more details on this topic, see Hot water extraction. Although there is an actual steam cleaning industrial process, in the context of carpet cleaning, "steam cleaning" is, in fact, hot water extraction cleaning. 

The hot water extraction cleaning method uses equipment that sprays heated water, sometimes with added cleaning chemicals, on the carpet. Simultaneously, the water is vacuumed up, along with any dislodged and dissolved dirt. Many carpet manufacturers recommend professional hot water extraction as the most effective carpet cleaning method.[citation needed] Actual steam could damage man-made carpet fibers or shrink natural fibers such as wool.[citation needed] Hot water extraction equipment may be a portable unit that plugs into an electrical outlet, or a truck mount carpet cleaner requiring long hoses from the truck or trailer. Truck mounted equipment may be used where electricity is unavailable (e.g. if electrical service was terminated). Truck mount carpet cleaning may be unsuited to premises distant from a driveway or road, and hoses may need to pass through windows to reach upper floors of a building. Hoses needed for truck mount and professional portable carpet cleaning may present an inconvenience or tripping hazard to users of hallways, and pets or children can escape through doors that must be left ajar for hoses. Heated or air conditioned air will also escape from buildings when doors are left open for hoses, potentially creating a significant waste of energy. Truck mounted carpet cleaning equipment minimizes noise in the room being cleaned, but truck mounted carpet cleaning equipment may cause noise and air pollution offensive to neighbors, and may violate anti-idling bylaws in some jurisdictions. However, truck-mounted cleaning is much faster than portable equipment, and extra heat and power can give faster drying times. The hot water extraction method is the preferred method of many carpet manufacturers.[citation needed] Extraction is, by far, the most important step in the hot water extraction process. Since the hot-water extraction method uses much more water than other methods like bonnet or shampoo cleaning, proper extraction and air flow are critical to avoid drying issues. Drying time may also be decreased by extra use of fans, air conditioning, and/or outdoor ventilation.[3] Older surfaces, such as double jute-backed carpets and loose rugs with natural foundation yarns, could shrink after a wet treatment, leading to suppositions that wet-cleaning could also remove wrinkles.[citation needed] However, this notion is antiquated and this method could also occasionally tear seams or uproot strips.[citation needed] Newer carpets, such as with synthetic backing and foundation yarns, do not shrink, and they smooth easily; in such carpets, wrinkles indicate an underlying problem, such as adhesive, that may need a certified carpet inspector to determine.[4] 

Models include upright (dirty-air and clean-air), canister and backpack, wet-dry and pneumatic, and other varieties. Robotic vacuum cleaners have recently become available. Stain removal[edit] Cleaned and uncleaned areas of a carpet Tea leaves and cut grass were formerly common for floor cleaning, to collect dust from carpets, albeit with risks of stains. Ink was removed with lemon or with oxalic acid and hartshorn; oil with white bread or with pipe clay; grease fats with turpentine; ox gall and naphtha were also general cleaners. Ammonia and chloroform were recommended for acid discoloration. Benzine and alum were suggested for removing insects;[10] diatomaceous earth and material similar to cat litter are still common for removing infestations. Candle wax is removed by placing a towel over the affected carpet area and applying steam from a clothes iron until the wax absorbs into the towel. Some traditional methods of stain removal remain successful and ecological. Caution should be addressed when treating natural fibers such as wool. The longer the stain material remains in the carpet, the higher the chance of permanent color change, even if all the original stain material is removed. At times pets urinate on the carpet and this results in a bad odor especially when it is hot and humid.The carpet or rug is usually taken outside and immersed in water to remove such stains. Immediately blotting (not rubbing) the stain material as soon as possible will help reduce the chances of permanent color change. Artificial food coloring stains are generally considered permanent stains. These may be removed by professional cleaners or deep cleaning rental machines with heat-transfer stain-reducing chemicals, but carry risks of burning the carpet. Stain removal products can be combined with anti-allergen treatments to kill house dust mites. Other[edit] Carpet rods, rattan rugbeaters, and carpet-beating machines for beating out dust, and also brooms, brushes, dustpans, and shaking and hanging were all carpet-cleaning methods of the 19th century; brooms particularly carry risks of wear. Steam cleaning increases the lifespan of your carpet.[10] Misconceptions[edit] Robert Wittkamp (1942–2007), IICRC-certified master Carpet Cleaners technician with 30 years' expertise in carpet cleaning, commented that old wives' tales persist and thrive within the industry. For instance, the concept that walking barefoot on a carpet may lead to damage from body oils has not been supported or disproven by standardized reports or testing or by industry evidence.[4]